Talking Stick Arts Newsletter
         
   

Issue 2.1 | Jan/Feb/Mar 1999

Contents

Jake Swamp: The Tree of Peace |by Steve Elm

"Jake Swamp, Chief for the Wolf Clan of the Mohawk Nation, has traveled all over the world planting trees of peace. In fact, he is responsible for the growth of over two million specimens of living art, currently growing from the Catskills all the way to China. This he did as Director of the Tree of Peace Society"...click here for more...

Two Poems | by Jacque Garneau

Jacque Garneau - Author and teacher of traditional wisdom, Jacque Garneau, is a Cherokee/Choctaw elder who is the author of Rattlesnake Singing, the first in a series of pocket-sized books of poetry and spiritual aphorisms. Out of a deep commitment, Jacque is finding ways to help Indian people fulfill their potential in an atmosphere of opportunity and dignity through her writing. In addition to writing, Ms. Garneau teaches beadwork and basket weaving. Jacque (U-wo-ha-li Ka-no-hi-li-hi I-yu-sti-/She Who Soars Like An Eagle) is a member of the Wolf Clan of the Cherokee ...click here here for more...

The Age of the Artist |by Alexander Ewen

One time about ten years back I remember my grandfather, the late Frederic Ewen, being asked what he had thought of the film, Amadeus, which he had just seen. His answer left a deep impression on me. He said, "They," meaning Hollywood, "have so much money that they can do anything - except create a work of art." What I find interesting today is that "they," meaning the giant media and entertainment corporations, though they have even more money and more power, are not only still unable to create a work of art, they are finding it increasingly difficult to even create a decent product. They are by and large becoming less and less entertaining - let alone trying to break new creative ground - and as a consequence fewer and fewer people are watching their shows, listening to their music, or reading their books... click here for more...

Labor of Love: Keeping a Tradition Alive |by Steve Elm

Deborah Ann Mullins (Eastern Cherokee) placed her Cherokee doll on the table. The doll, named "Kamama" ("butterfly" in Cherokee) seemed to be dancing. Her shawl was flowing, her right arm was raised, and in her hand a feather. "This doll is dancing" confirmed Deborah. "When I make my dolls, I visualize a story behind the doll. I give her a character. One of my dolls is just entering her first competition". She places another doll on the table. This one is dressed in Plains style. "She's waiting for the Grand Entry" Deborah confides... click here for more...

Funding Opportunities

Find out the latest on residencies, festivals, markets, fellowships, prizes, internships, classes, rehearsal spaces and much more ...click here for more...

 
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