Talking Stick Arts Newsletter
         
   

Issue 4.3 | Jul/Aug/Sept 2001

Contents

Native American Actors Showcase | by Tim Hays

Back around 1980 I had several acquaintances who were avid theater and film goers; we would discuss the events of the day as well as what was currently on a stage or screen. One of the more pointed conversations had to do with their aggressive inquiries on why all the Indian roles on films were acted by Italian-Americans and not by Native American actors. At the time I had a feeling of impotence and loss, not quite knowing what to say; it would appear that the world had two eras, one of the spaghetti western (invariably, the Indians would lose the battle, the cowboy get his ‘girl’, and patriarchy rule the day), and the world after Dances With...? click here for more...

The Art of Baseketmaking | by MariJo Moore

Basket making is a living tradition among Cherokee people, each creation holding many mysteries. Beautiful colorful baskets of white oak splints, split river cane, and honeysuckle are perhaps the best-known crafts. Some Cherokee basket weavers were taught this intricate yet delicate art by their mothers and grandmothers. Others simply listen to the materials gathered and ask what shape they desire.To celebrate my birthday this year, one of my elder’s aunts gifted me with a basket. She told me, “When I wove this basket, I held it close to my body so as to impart my spirit into it’s heart. In gifting you with this basket, I am giving you a part of my spirit.” My aunt’s grandmother told her that since a basket lives, it must be fed. So in the spring, my aunt takes all her baskets outside and leaves them in the rain to nourish them... click here for more...

Fullblood Predjudice | by George Stonefish Willis

Hi, I’m back AGAIN!! It’s your favorite Delaware/Chippewa/Ottawa, Ex-con, opinionated lifetime parolee. Of course I have another unpopular bone to pick with my Native brothers and sisters. Yup, you guessed it - it’s about “full blood prejudice.” You know what I mean; I’m talking about that misguided and mistaken belief that a full blood quantum Native is any better, or more Native than a mixed blood... click here for more ...

A Walk With The People | by Steve Elm

Following a private dedication on June 2, the Shinnecock Cultural Center and Museum opened to the public on June 16 2001. Located at West Gate Road of the reservation and Montauk Highway, the Center/Museum is spaced in a beautiful white pine log building, much like the traditional long house of the East Coast. The building was built by Beaver Creek Log Homes of Oneida Nation and is the perfect setting for what will surely soon be the center of the Shinnecock community... click here for more...

Seven Sisters | Poetry by Clifford Bernie

Clifford Bernie (Storm Horse), Ihanktonwan Nakota, is a tribal member from one of the seven council fires of the Lakota, Nakota and Dakota Nation. A displaced social worker currently employed at the American Indian Community House in a Security/Maintenance position, he came to New York City in pursuit of fulfilling a life long goal - to publish a collection of Native poetry... click here for more...

 
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